Abstract A study of the mechanism of the rapid deterioration of cassava roots has shown that this requires the presence of oxygen and scopoletin the latter a Scopoletin Involvement in Post-Harvest Physiological Deterioration of Cassava Root (Manihot esculenta Crantz) Journal of Experimental Botany Volume 36 Issue 5 May 1985 Pages 783 Physiological postharvest deterioration (PPD) of cassava roots is an endogenous and complex process that restricts their storage potential to only a few days after harvest This physiological phenomenon is one of the main constraints in cassava agriculture with an enormous impact on the cassava market chain

Procedures for evaluating the tolerance of cassava

to postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) and to microbial deterioration (MD) Roots of six cassava genotypes were evaluated in two experiments during storage under different environmental conditions: high temperature and low soil moisture or low temperature and high soil moisture

The production of cassava the most important staple root crop in the world is constrained by the short shelf life of the cassava storage roots that are undergoing post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) shortly after harvest PPD reduces starch quality and renders the roots

Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) Cassava root samples (12 months old) were collected for analysis of non-stored samples and for induction of physiological deterioration under controlled conditions in the laboratory Immediately after harvest the roots were washed proximal and distal parts of the root

Physiological deterioration in cassava roots appears to share many of the common characteristics of plant wound responses However the sealing and healing aspects necessary for survival seem poorly expressed and are less localized in harvested cassava roots (Booth 1976 Rickard and Coursey 1981)

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important starch‐rich crop but the storage roots only have a short shelf‐life due to post‐harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) which includes the over‐production and polymerisation of hydroxycoumarins Key aspects of coumarin secondary‐metabolite biosynthesis remain unresolved Here we exploit the accumulation of hydroxycoumarins to test

Physiological deterioration of cassava roots Journal of

Physiological deterioration of cassava roots Physiological deterioration of cassava roots Rickard June E 1985-03-01 00:00:00 Tropical Development and Research Institute 5 M 2 Gray's Inn Road London W Cl X 8LU (Manuscript received 27 February 1984) Rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration of cassava roots (Munihot esculentu Crantz) appears to be due essentially to wound

2 3 Cassava storage roots formation and induction A cassava plant can form up to 14 storage roots per plant depending on the genotype Storage root can initiate from three distinct sources of plant propagating material These include direct embryonic root formation at the seed germination event to form a single-tap SR () the leaf axillaries bud in stem cuttings forming a single SR () and a

Physiological deterioration of cassava roots Physiological deterioration of cassava roots Rickard June E 1985-03-01 00:00:00 Tropical Development and Research Institute 5 M 2 Gray's Inn Road London W Cl X 8LU (Manuscript received 27 February 1984) Rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration of cassava roots (Munihot esculentu Crantz) appears to be due essentially to wound

A major constraint to the development of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) as a crop to both farmers and processors is its starchy storage roots' rapid post-harvest deterioration which can render it unpalatable and unmarketable within 24–72 h An oxidative burst occurs within 15 min of the root being injured that is followed by the altered regulation of genes notably for catalase and

2 Post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) is one of the most important 3 constraints in cassava production and commercialization It has been 4 hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of carotenoids in yellow cassava roots 5 may help reduce or delay PPD The industrial sector prefers cassava with a high 6 dry matter content

Mar 23 2015This brief was prepared to support the Roots Tubers and Bananas team evaluate the current severity of cassava bacterial blight (CBB) and postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) production impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)

Jun 28 2020However after harvest the tuberous roots undergo rapid postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) a known perishable phenomenon that usually appears within 72 h postharvest PPD largely reduces the quality and economic value of cassava tuberous roots restricting the use of cassava as a raw material in the food industry

Currently Brazil is the fourth-largest cassava producer with production exceeding 21 million tons (FAO 2014) A major obstacle in the competitiveness of the cassava production chain compared to other starch crops is post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) which forces immediate marketing and processing of the root after harvest

Tolerance to Postharvest Physiological Deterioration in

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots spoil 2 to 3 d after harvest because of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) which has remained an unsolved problem Roots from different sources of germplasm were evaluated 5 10 20 and 40 d

Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is one of the most important tropical crops [1 2] Due to the short postharvest shelf-life of cassava its potential market benefit to cassava farmers is severely restricted Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) is harmful during harvesting and safekeeping and the burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results in serious cell oxidative damage [2 3 4 5]

Postharvest Physiological Deterioration of Cassava roots: New Insights 978-3-659-71778-9 9783659717789 3659717789 Agriculture horticulture forestry fishery nutrition Since the onset of the food crisis there has been a change in development priorities bringing an increased focus on agriculture and a renewed interest in the reduction of postharvest losses as a means of increasing

Off colors that accrue from oxidative postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of stored cassava tuberous roots pose a serious limitation to its large scale processing Twelve white fleshed cassava genotypes were used to evaluate the effect of prolonged PPD on the color hues of cassava flour and dried chips produced from them at 1st 7th and

Background: In spite of the essential role of cassava in ensuring food security and employment for most rural farm s postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of the roots which is serious abiotic stress in cassava renders the

Backgrounds In spite of the essential role of cassava in ensuring food security and employment for most rural farm s postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of the roots which is serious abiotic stress in cassava renders the roots unmarketable thereby reducing the economic value of the crop

Cassava roots that exhibit visible symptoms of physiological deterioration are considered to have poor eating and processing quality Although no survey work has been undertaken on this topic the following observations have been made regarding cassava that has developed physiological deterioration (Rickard Wheatley and Gilling 1992 C C

Physiological postharvest deterioration (PPD) of cassava roots is an endogenous and complex process that restricts their storage potential to only a few days after harvest This physiological phenomenon is one of the main constraints in cassava agriculture with an enormous impact on the cassava market chain

Jun 01 20181 Introduction Cassava is the sixth most important crop in terms of global production following wheat maize and rice and is mainly grown for its edible tuberous roots (Zhang et al 2010 Zidenga et al 2012) Based on its high starch production cassava is also considered as a potential biofuel crop (Zidenga et al 2012) However the rapid postharvest physiological deterioration of

vest physiological deterioration (PPD) in the roots (Djabou et al 2017 Liu et al 2017 Zainuddin et al 2018) PPD rapidly renders the roots unpalatable and unmarketable few days after harvest Consequently cassava roots need to be consumed soon after harvest unless they are preserved in some manner (van Oirschot et al 2000)

Cassava is an important tropical crop that is rich of starch in storage roots Nevertheless the rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of its storage roots a unique browning phenomenon comes within 2 - 3 days of harvest is the bottleneck of cassava industrialization that has serious impact on the economic benefits to farmers and processing enterprises